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Details

Submitted on
August 27, 2011
Image Size
2.9 MB
Resolution
3732×2097
Link
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Embed

Stats

Views
646
Favourites
28 (who?)
Comments
6

Camera Data

Make
NIKON CORPORATION
Model
NIKON D300
Shutter Speed
1/160 second
Aperture
F/6.3
Focal Length
70 mm
ISO Speed
320
Date Taken
Aug 13, 2011, 1:26:34 PM
Software
Adobe Photoshop CS3 Macintosh
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Harmony Smile Courage by AndySerrano Harmony Smile Courage by AndySerrano
Harmony Smile Courage

:iconsooper-deviant: sooper-deviant featured this in his [link] journal.

[link] More Japanese gallery
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:iconyagamiseven:
Yagamiseven Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2012
this is really cool
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:iconandyserrano:
AndySerrano Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Oh Good!
Reply
:icondamianshima:
damianshima Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2011  Student Artist
Wow. Awsome!
Reply
:iconandyserrano:
AndySerrano Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
:icondbthx4::icondbthx5::icondbthx6: on Harmony Smile Courage. The Chinese roots of Japanese calligraphy go back to the twenty-eighth century BCE, to a time when pictographs were inscribed on bone for religious purposes. When this writing developed into an instrument of administration for the state, the need for a uniform script was felt and Li Si, prime minister in the Chinese dynasty of Qin, standardized a script and its way of being written. He sanctioned a form of script based on squares of uniform size into which all characters could be written from eight strokes. He also devised rules of composition where horizontal strokes are written first and characters are composed starting from top to bottom, left to right. [link]
Reply
:iconinobras:
inObrAS Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2011
:thumbsup::nod:
Reply
:iconandyserrano:
AndySerrano Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
:icondbthx4::icondbthx5::icondbthx6: on Harmony Smile Courage. The Chinese roots of Japanese calligraphy go back to the twenty-eighth century BCE, to a time when pictographs were inscribed on bone for religious purposes. When this writing developed into an instrument of administration for the state, the need for a uniform script was felt and Li Si, prime minister in the Chinese dynasty of Qin, standardized a script and its way of being written. He sanctioned a form of script based on squares of uniform size into which all characters could be written from eight strokes. He also devised rules of composition where horizontal strokes are written first and characters are composed starting from top to bottom, left to right. [link]
Reply
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